GPSgames.org Where in the
world is that?
 
Shutterspot
Shutterspot  Shutterspot  Shutterspot  Shutterspot
  arrow Home arrow Articles arrow Games arrow Geodashing: Feb09 15:35 Sunday, 17 December 2017 UTC    
Login Form
Username

Password

Remember me
Forgotten your password?
No account yet? Create one

Main Menu
 Home
 Games
 Articles
 Games
 Web site
 FAQ
 Email lists
 Shops
 All Web Links
 Contact Us
 About

Support Us!

No fees.
No paid ads.
100% free since 2001
thanks to you.

Geodashing: Feb09   Print  E-mail 
Contributed by Scout  

Results: Geodashing Game 92

"Located on the south face of Pusch Ridge and about 1000 vertical feet
above the Pima Canyon Trail, the dashpoint's call became louder as
February became closer.  Using binoculars and Google Earth, I
determined that a large boulder just outside the scoring circle would
be an easy reference on our hike.  The plan was relatively straight
forward, we would drive the short distance to the Pima Canyon
Trailhead and follow the trail for about a mile before beginning a
challenging bushwack/scramble up the southern face of the ridge to a
point just below a significant vertical face.  Just because you can
see something doesn’t mean you can necessarily get there -- or that it
will be easy...  Our target rock was easy to see but as we scrambled
up the scree and talus, our progress slowed considerably.  At times we
were reduced to hand over foot scrambling.  There were multiple
drainages that ran almost parallel to our upslope track. The views
were breathtaking, as the sun came over the southern ridge and into
the valley.  For a moment, it brilliantly illuminated all of the
saguaro spines."

That's Geodashing in Arizona with Wisk

"About 2 km into the desert we found the road that went through a
small opening in a very steep ravine [about 3m high] completely closed
off due to a sand dune that had blown over the road. No problem, with
GPSr's in hand we knew where we were heading and proceeded around the
hazard. After a few minutes I noticed that my friend was no longer
following. I turned around and found him stuck up to his axles in soft
sand as he attempted to go over a small dune. He decided that he
didn't need to follow my tracks and made his own! An hour later we had
managed to get his Durango out of the sand and off we went. Duly
climbed the "peak" and off we went to the DP. Halfway along the way
the Durango disappeared off the radar once again. This time it lost
its propshaft!! Decided to have our picnic lunch at this stage and
repaired the Durango at the same time."

That's Geodashing in Saudi Arabia with cincol

==================================

Game 92 of Geodashing was won by team "GeoTerriers," their second win
in a row. Honorable mentions go to teams "Home for the Itinerant" and
"Dashed Hopes."

Jack Frickey took individual honors, thanks to a 700 mile, two day mad
dash across West Virginia, Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Maryland (8
dashpoints on day one, 5 dashpoints on day two).

Honorable mentions go to McMeanderer and RogBarn, thanks to his own
mad dash across Missouri and Illinois (11.5 hours and 476 miles on the
road), scoring 8 dashpoints in one day (how many ways can one describe
a field of corn stalks?).

The game saw 85 dashpoint hunts in ten countries (Australia, the US,
Germany, Qatar, Finland, Switzerland, Denmark, the Czech Republic, and
the game's first ever visit to Saudi Arabia).

==================================

A sampling of waypoints visited by Geodashing players this month:

in a large empty paddock in Victoria, Australia, housing only dry
grass and tall electrical transmission line towers, along with a
strong smell of burning eucalypts from a nearby bushfire

in an alley in Minneapolis, "covered with un-removed snow, compacted
to ice with deep wheel tracks in the ice"

in the Qatar desert, in flat land with a few scrub trees, at the time
occupied by a camel herder with about 30 odd camels in his care

in a small lake in Germany ("although the lake had frozen, I did not
venture onto the ice")

in a neglected conservation area in an industrial area in Melbourne,
along a dirt track used for "motocross riding, four-wheel drive
hooning and as a repository for all sorts of rubbish"

on a small hill, in a stand of birch, overlooking the sewage disposal
ponds of Minong, Wisconsin

in an empty field of plowed corn stalks in Illinois, near the site of
a 2001 car accident in which the driver hit the ditch, rolled his car
several times and suffered only a broken arm ("seat belts work")

in Virginia, near a large dressage arena with lots of jumping
apparatus scattered haphazardly around the area

near a large estate under construction near Salem, Oregon, ("likely
one of the last McMansions to be built as the sprawl economy has
collapsed")

in Utah, in barren desert ground within view of the Intermountain
Power Plant, a large coal-fired electrical generating station that
sends most of its output to southern California

in the middle of the Finland's Lake Immala, 900 m from the closest
shoreline ("Obviously dashpoint generator knows that lakes here in
Finland now have got a thick ice cover")

in dense brush on French Island, in Australia's Westernport Bay,
reached on a hike of 23.8 km

in a cornfield in Nebraska, undistinguished but with a few interesting
snow drifts sculpted by the strong wind

in a forest in the Czech Republic, down a steep slope where the air
was quite wet and formed something like a fog or haze

in thorny raspberry canes surrouned by an Austrian forest where the
snow was fresh, powdery and so clean

in California's high Mojave desert, near the surprising "Geo Chain" art
installations (check it out at 39forks.com).

in a forest in Switzerland, near a small footpath in a patch where
small aspens are growing

and close to a tire swing hanging from a majestic oak in front of a
rundown orangeish-brown trailer home in West Virginia


==================================

Thanks to all the Geodashing players, whose many great reports are
quoted here, not always with proper attribution. Complete, original
reports are available on the Web site.

==================================

About Geodashing: Geodashing is a game in which players use GPS
receivers on a playing field that covers the entire planet. The
waypoints, or dashpoints, to be reached are randomly selected. The win
goes to who can get to the most dashpoints; that is, if you can get to
them at all! Each game has a new set of dashpoints making each game
different and unpredictable. For more information and to play, visit
http://GPSgames.org .

 

Last Updated ( 17:15 Thursday, 05 March 2009 UTC )


 
 

Click to learn how to get your own banner
Advertisement
Latest Articles
Geodashing: Nov17
Geodashing: Oct17
Geodashing: Sep17

: Home : : Games : : Articles : : Email lists : : Shops : : All Web Links : : Contact Us : : About :
Copyright © GPSgames.org