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Geodashing: May14   Print  E-mail 
Contributed by Scout  

Results: Geodashing Game 155 (GDCD)

"The track went through some WILD country, THICK with rainforest style
scrub thick with vines, but STEEP as anything as I've seen. When the
GPS said 'stop here' I was still 1 kilometer away in a straight line,
with a huge gully in between. So I drove about another kilometer down
the trail, and sure enough there was a gated forestry trail that went
UP the hillside in the direction I wanted. I started at 1.2 km from
the geodash, and at one stage going up the steep hill I got to 530 m,
but then got further away until reaching the ridge. 650 m didn't seem
so far now, so off I went. Nice to see one small kangaroo (but heard a
heap more). Took some photos, and headed on back. As I was trotting
down the hill I disturbed a tawny frogmouth ('owl relative') and quite
a few kangaroos."

That's Geodashing in New South Wales with Grahame Cookie

"This was a great dashpoint, for Nebraska. I would never have imagined
such a remote and wild spot. I was driving in open grassland and ranch
country when SR12 took a bend north. For two miles I had straight
roads, then it got funky. The first road I tried took me to an obvious
ranch road. So I backtracked and continued west connecting to Turkey
Creek Avenue. Sure enough, a wild turkey was actually running down the
road in front of me and finally decided to fly. Turkey Creek Road,
which is very sandy and rutted, headed downhill into a ravine. I'm
glad I'm here today instead of my planned visit yesterday as it snowed
and rained and so the road had deep ruts plus a few mud holes, glad to
have an AWD. The road was very curvy (following a nice creek). I had
to dodge a recent landslide and got within 700m, but continued south
to toward the Niobrara River, which is designated as a Wild and Scenic
National River, very popular later in the season with boaters, but
deserted now. While it's still early spring (did I mention it snowed
just yesterday) and so the area is just beginning to be green, but it
was a great view in an amazing remote spot, that is for Nebraska."

That's Geodashing in Nebraska with Douq Millar

==================================

Game 155 (GDCD) of Geodashing was won by team GeoTerriers, their sixth
win in a row. Honorable mentions go to Llama League and Laid Back
Dashers.

Individual honors go to SoccerFanatics. Honorable mentions go to
Grahame Cookie and Douq Millar.

The game saw 74 dashpoint hunts in seven countries (US, New Zealand,
Australia, Estonia, Austria, Germany and the game's first ever visit
to Ukraine).

==================================

A sampling of waypoints visited by Geodashing players this month:

in Ukraine, on the overgrown left bank of the Vovk river near of the
Bohdanivtsi village, near numerous yellow fields of rapeseeds

in a paddock near a mob of sheep along Moorabool West Road in
Victoria, Australia

on the edge of the woods in Gusen Valley, near Reichenau, Austria

along a dirt road on an uncultivated hillside above Sevier Valley,
Utah

just out of scoring range beyond fences on private land in New Zealand
("Oh well....got to have a very pleasant ride on my motorcycle in what
was glorious weather for late autumn.")

on the Hume Freeway north of Melbourne, Australia

in the Tallarook district of Victoria, on a wide verge planted with
gum trees with paddocks of sheep and cattle on both sides ("Things are
crook in Tallarook ...")

near a restored police call box just off P Street NW in Washington,
DC, at the west end of the bridge over Rock Creek Parkway, near

north of Denver, near the York Street bridge over the South Platte
River trail

across the road from a dairy farm west of Melbourne, in a hilly and
very green area with well-grassed paddocks which had benefited from
the recent heavy rains

in Oxnard, California, in front of El Rio Elementary School with lots
of golden-yellow school buses

in a little hidden subdivision of million dollar homes outside Chicago

in typical bush in New South Wales's Coorabakh National Park

in Nebraska, in a muddy cornfield that doesn't appear to be planted
yet ("classic featureless Nebraska farm country")

in Illinois, east of the Mississippi River from St Louis, in an
upscale residential area with French-sounding street names and large
(but not huge) houses on large lots

in very flat and open rangeland on the eastern edge of the Nebraska
Sandhills ("some eroded sanddunes were visible from the road; a
beautiful large brown hawk was sitting on the fencepost")

next to a willow tree along the path of a small nature reserve "NSG
Uedesheimer Rheinbogen" in a curve of Germany's river Rhine

in a walnut orchard north of Sacramento, California

in the nowhere grasslands of western North Dakota, mostly featureless
rolling hills prairie

in high desert south of Dinosaur National Monument in Utah, near a few
Sego Lilies, the state flower of Utah

in a fallow field in Arizona, just off I-10, within sight of
"Cochise's Head," a feature in mountain range in the distance

outside Ballarat, Victoria, Australia, along Avenue Road, lined with
hundreds of trees and memorial plaques for soldiers

in Virginia, just 112 meters off a dirt road, BUT, there is a grove of
bamboo growing up to the edge of the road ("the 40 feet I had to go
took a long time, squeezing my way between closely-spaced 20-foot-tall
bamboo")

and in Emmitsburg, Maryland, at the shrine of Saint Elizabeth Ann
Seton, the first native-born citizen of the United States to be
canonized by the Roman Catholic Church

==================================

Rep offers encouragement to all environmentally-sensitive Geodashing
players:

"This month I had the chance to reach 3 dashpoints by bicycle. Today I
did it :-)"

==================================

Thanks to all the Geodashing players, whose many great reports are
quoted here, not always with proper attribution. Complete, original
reports are available on the Web site.

==================================

About Geodashing: Geodashing is a game in which players use GPS
receivers on a playing field that covers the entire planet. The
waypoints, or dashpoints, to be reached are randomly selected. The win
goes to who can get to the most dashpoints; that is, if you can get to
them at all! Each game has a new set of dashpoints making each game
different and unpredictable. For more information and to play, visit
http://GPSgames.org .

Last Updated ( 16:31 Wednesday, 04 June 2014 UTC )


 
 

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