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Geodashing: Jun15   Print  E-mail 
Contributed by Scout  

Results: Geodashing Game 168 (GDCQ)

"My Mother and her family had spent some time in the region between
the mid 1920's and 1930's before moving to Sydney. Her brothers had
been timber getters. Occasionally we would head back for a school
holiday visit to see distant and not so distant relatives. It seemed a
wild country. I would take the joy of checking out the rugged terrain
that my uncles worked in at jinking the logs out. The first 'track'
(showing on the GPSr, but not reality) quickly went the wrong
direction, so I went back. Again there was an OVERGROWN logging track,
but again it headed off from the desired direction. At that stage as I
headed downhill on foot, there was a lot of small/thin lawyer vines to
trip up the unwary, and I wished I had brought my walking pole along.
I persisted down to a creek where I was surprised to see a 'bulldozed'
track going somewhat diagonal to my plotted course, but now only 200m
from the dashpoint. While visibility was good and clear it didn't mean
that the going was easy, and it was up hill and down dale and up hill
for the last 100m. With several logs over 1.5m diameter to clamber
over I finally got to one ~1.6m high, with the GPSr showing only 105m
to GZ. But I was blocked off in either direction by a 'solid wall' of
unforgiving lantana. I launched myself up onto the mossy log and "WHAT
the !@#$", there is a section of 'benched' logging track about 6m long
the other side of the log that also ended in impenetrable vines and
lantana. By doing my best 'crowd surfing' leap I was able to get a
consistent 99m reading. Now on the wrong side of the log I finally
worked a way back to the nice creek and bulldozed track. When I got
home I found that I had been host to only one leech."

That's Geodashing in New South Wales with Grahame Cookie

 

==================================

Game 168 (GDCQ) of Geodashing was won by team GeoTerriers, their
eleventh win in a row, by a wide margins over En Dash! and Laid Back
Dashers.

Individual honors go to Tom Arneson. Honorable mentions go to Graham
Cookie and AquaDyne.

The game saw 45 dashpoint hunts in five countries (US, Australia,
Croatia, Germany and UK).

==================================

A sampling of waypoints visited by Geodashing players this month:

across a low broken stone fence in an area of housing estates and
hobby farms north of Melbourne

in front of a red brick row house with a white iron fence in Brooklyn

along a driveway to a modern style log house in Minnesota with a
nearby rectangular pond, probably excavated for fill for the house's
foundation

in an eastern suburb of Melbourne, along the aptly named street Shady
Grove, in front of a brick house with a shabby, over-run garden

in a modern residential neighborhood of Rheinbach, Germany, where kids
were playing footie in the garden

at a house in suburban Salt Lake City with light tan aluminum siding,
red shutters, a red door and green grass

near a nice manor house in Krapina-Zagorje County, Croatia

on a tree-lined road in Atherton, California, lined with some of the
area's smaller mansions all hidden behind hedges and trees (e.g., 5
BR, 5 1/2 baths, 7,884 sq feet, $8.9 million)

600 meters across dirt-that-will-soon-be-houses in Henderson, Nevada,
outside Las Vegas

on a two-lane gravel road in a Minnesota national forest of mixed
woods, mostly birch

in the arid New Mexico desert along NM-338 about 4 miles off I-10,
scored on the way to zip-lining at Ski Apache

along a narrow dirt road west of Melbourne, in a paddock with no
animals ("On the way in we saw horses, sheep, goats, alpacas and
cattle as well as a dead wombat and three dead kangaroos.")

in beautiful Pennsylvania farm country with rolling hills planted with
corn

in a field with knee-high corn in Minnesota's Drift-less Zone, because
it was not flattened by the last ice age, leaving well developed
drainage patterns and deep valleys

in Iowa, in a field with still very young soybeans ("There has been
unusually high rainfall so many fields have not been planted.")

out of reach in a military area of New South Wales ("DANGER - Military
Range Boundary - Live Firing")

south of St. Louis, near Mastodon State Historic Site, in back of a
house that sat up pretty high with a wide, sloping lawn down to the
road

in New South Wales among some lovely tree ferns on the edge of a
precipice where you could see eagles soaring at the same height
through the trees

and in the dense woods of the Flight 93 National Memorial in
Pennsylvania, just south of the site of the crash on September 11,
2001

==================================

Thanks to all the Geodashing players, whose many great reports are
quoted here, not always with proper attribution. Complete, original
reports are available on the Web site.

==================================

About Geodashing: Geodashing is a game in which players use GPS
receivers on a playing field that covers the entire planet. The
waypoints, or dashpoints, to be reached are randomly selected. The win
goes to who can get to the most dashpoints; that is, if you can get to
them at all! Each game has a new set of dashpoints making each game
different and unpredictable. For more information and to play, visit
http://GPSgames.org .

 

Last Updated ( 17:46 Saturday, 04 July 2015 UTC )


 
 

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